7 Fruits and Vegetables that You Can Grow in an Apartment

Help us create more awareness! Please share this article...
Share on Facebook
Facebook
128Share on Google+
Google+
0Tweet about this on Twitter
Twitter
Pin on Pinterest
Pinterest
0Share on Reddit
Reddit
0

5. Watermelon

(Watermelon) Citrullus lanatus

Another delicious fruit on this list that may come as a surprise, but it’s all about choosing a smaller variety such as Sugar Babies. These can easily be grown from seeds in a 5-gallon bucket that has good drainage. Just plant one seed per bucket after the threat of frost has passed.

Protect your plants from wind as they grow, and to encourage vertical growth, you can add a trellis. If the fruit appears to be too heavy for the plant, you may use plant bags to hang them on the trellis as they finish growing.

6. Peas

Both snap and shelling peas can be grown in a container with relative ease. Plus, they are fast growers which means you get a quicker reward for your effort. You can begin planting in the spring as soon as the temperatures stay above 60 degrees Fahrenheit. Put them in a large container that has good drainage and is filled with good potting soil. You should regularly fertilize your growing peas without giving them too much nitrogen.

English: Studio photo of peas in their pods.

You can easily begin peas from seeds by placing them 1 to 2 inches apart, then adding an inch of soil on top of them. The soil should be kept moist without being wet, and left in the shade until the plants begin to germinate. Once they have germinated, they can be moved to receive full sun. It’s also important for peas to have something to climb, so be sure to provide them with a trellis that they can climb.

The type of pea you are growing will determine when you harvest them. Snap peas are better if they are harvested when they are young while shelling peas should be allowed to fully mature.

Castroville's nickname celebrates its status a...

7. Artichokes

The Globe variety does the best in containers, and will provide you with beautiful dense buds that you can harvest after their long growing season. They do take up a decent amount of space, so be sure to choose a good-sized container. They also need large amounts of fertilizer and water, particularly when they begin to produce their buds.

Start with seeds 8 weeks before the last estimated frost date in your area. Sow them ¼ inch apart and ¼ inch deep. Depending on your region, you may be able to leave them outside in the fall and winter. If you live in a colder region, you may have to bring them in for the winter.

(Visited 12,605 times, 1 visits today)
How to Grow Asparagus in a Container
10 Simple Soil Tests
Help us create more awareness! Please share this article...
Share on Facebook
Facebook
128Share on Google+
Google+
0Tweet about this on Twitter
Twitter
Pin on Pinterest
Pinterest
0Share on Reddit
Reddit
0