8 Edibles You Can Grow Indoors in the Winter

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5. Carrots

korenje
Photo: credit to Flickr/Chiot’s Run

How to Grow: Outspread seeds on top of the potting soil and sprinkle water on it evenly. Allow the carrots to have plenty space in relation to their sizes in order to grow well—you can as well collect and arrange more carrots in the pots if you got plan to take them as infants. Allow the soil to have equal degree of moisture and exercise patience, as carrots can take up to 14 days to germinate. Once the carrots have germinated, spread in 1 inch apart in all directions. Pull your carrots straight up from the soil once they have displayed their full color.

How to Use: Carrots could be used to garnish salads. Matured ones make a delicious addition to roasts and soups.

6. Citrus Fruits

How to Grow: Choose deep pots slightly larger than the root ball. Fill with a potting soil specific to citrus trees. Citrus needs a lot of sunlight, at least eight hours per day but preferably 12 hours. Keep the soil on the dry side, but still evenly watered. Citrus trees can move outside in the spring.

Cautions: Citrus appreciates a humid climate, so mist the leaves or place near a humidifier occasionally. Avoid shock in the spring by slowly acclimating the plant to the outdoors, providing shade for a few days before exposing to full sun.

citrus
Photo: credit to Flickr/Michael McGreevey

How to Use: Citrus fruits are a gift in the winter, when they can apply their brightness almost anywhere—to fish and chicken, pies and cakes, sauces and marinades, and of course, eating out of hand.

7. Potatoes

krompir
Photo: credit to Flickr/Chiot’s Run

How to Grow: Potatoes can be grown inside a 5-gallon plastic container. Cut your seed potatoes into pieces with at least one eye in each piece and plant into 4- inches of topsoil mixed with compost, eye facing up. Potatoes should be planted 8 to 12 inches apart. Top with several inches of straw and place in a sunny window. After a couple weeks, the first shoots should appear through the straw. Keep the soil lightly moist but not soaking, and after several weeks, harvest baby potatoes from your box.

How to Use: Boil baby potatoes whole and toss with celery, carrots, vinegar and homemade mayo for a spring salad.

8. Pea Shoots

grah
Photo: credit to Flickr/Steve Wilde

How to Grow: Soaking dried pea seeds in a bowl of water for 24 hours before planting helps with germination. Drain the peas and plant them in compost, 1/2 inch deep. Peas don’t need a lot of room for root growth, so even shallow containers are acceptable. Peas can also be densely planted—just 1/4 inch is needed for shoots. Water evenly and place in a sunny window, and within two or three weeks you’ll have plenty of shoots for harvesting! Just pinch off above the bottom leaves.

How to Use: Pea shoots are deliciously sweet in salads and sandwiches.

 

Source: UrbanFarmOnline

Featured Image: credit to Flickr/Kari Morrison

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